Heartmath

Research shows how emotions change our heart rhythm patterns. Positive emotions create coherent heart rhythms, which look like rolling hills. In contrast, negative emotions create chaotic, erratic patterns. Coherent heart rhythm patterns facilitate higher brain function, whereas negative emotions inhibit a person’s ability to think clearly. Heartmath is a software that can help you achieve coherence and therefore help you reduce stress and anxiety with easy guided breathing exercises. Visit our office today to use it for free! Not sure? Visit our Online Self-Help section to find out more resources easily accessible from your own device, at your own pace.

 

Stress Facts

  • Your body doesn’t care if it’s a big stress or a little one.
    Regardless of the significance, stress affects the body in predictable ways. A typical stress reaction, which most of us experience dozens of times each day, begins with a cascade of 1,400 biochemical events in your body. If these reactions are left unchecked we age prematurely, our cognitive function is impaired, our energy is drained, and we are robbed of our effectiveness and clarity.
  • Stress can make smart people do stupid things.
    Stress causes what brain researchers call “cortical inhibition,” this phenomenon helps explain why smart people do dumb things. Simply said, stress inhibits a small part of your brain and you can’t function at your best. When we are in coherence – a state where we are cognitively sharp, emotionally calm, and we feel and think with enhanced clarity – the brain, heart and nervous system are working in harmony. This state of coherence facilitates our cognitive functioning – we are actually operating at peak performance mentally, emotionally and physically.
  • People can become numb to their stress.
    We can be physiologically experiencing stress yet mentally numb to it because we’ve become so accustomed to it. Some have become so adapted to the daily pressures, irritations and annoyances of life that it starts to seem normal. Yet the small stresses accumulate quickly and we may not realize how much they’re impairing our mental and emotional clarity and our overall health until it shows up as a bad decision, an overreaction or an unwanted diagnosis at the doctor’s office.
  • We can control how we respond to stress.
    We don’t need to be victims to our own emotions, thoughts and attitudes. We can control how we respond to stress and we can become more sensitive to stressful situations and how they are affecting us before it manifests as a physical, mental or emotional complaint. There are simple, scientifically validated solutions to stress that empower people to rewire their own stress response.
  • The best strategy is to handle stress in the moment.

    The best way to manage stress is to deal with it the very moment you feel it come up. Millions of Americans unsuccessfully use the binge-and-purge approach when it comes to stress. They stress out all day, believing that they can wait until later to recover when they go to an evening yoga class, go to the gym or chill out when they take the weekend off. Unfortunately, when we put off going for our own inner balance our bodies have already activated the stress response and it’s our health that suffers. Research shows how emotions change our heart rhythm patterns.

     

    All content adapted from Heartmath Infographics 2015.

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